Community Safety Surveys

Surveys are being delivered to households surrounding Mt. Scott Park. Your response is needed. The City would like to know if you observed a recent decrease in shootings or speeding since the summer. Would you like to see support continued? If your household reserves a survey it is important to respond to it.

Portland Street Response Pilot Adds Increased Areas of Service, Now Includes Majority of Mt. Scott-Arleta

News article originally from the City of Portland

Portland Street Response expanded its boundaries on April 1, 2021 to serve more areas and added additional call types.

Published: April 7, 2021 12:18 pm

Portland Street Response (PSR), the pilot program from the City of Portland that offers a non-police response to assist people experiencing houselessness or low acuity behavioral/mental health crises, expanded its boundaries on April 1, 2021 to serve more areas. The pilot began using the boundaries in the Lents neighborhood serviced by Portland Fire & Rescue (PF&R) Fire Station 11 and is now responding within eight Portland Police Bureau (PPB) districts in the greater Lents area.

Fire station service districts are called Fire Management Areas, or FMAs. After a month in service, an analysis of calls in consultation with PSR’s partners at the Bureau of Emergency Communication (BOEC) led program managers to see that the team was missing calls tied to police district areas just outside of the FMA. As part of the pilot, PSR is going to test assigning the areas to police districts rather than FMAs, which will result in expanded service to the greater Lents area.

Map showing the previous boundaries that were bordered by SE Powell Blvd. on the north, SE 82nd Ave. to the west, the Clackamas County and City of Portland boundary along Clatsop St. (roughly) on the south, and roughly SE 112th Ave. on the east. The map shows new boundaries that are primarily SE Division St. on the north, SE Clatsop St. (roughly) on the south, SE 62th Ave. (roughly) on the west, and Powell Butte along the eastern boundary.
Map showing previous boundary (shaded) and outline of new boundary in blue.

The previous boundaries were bordered by SE Powell Blvd. on the north, SE 82nd Ave. to the west, the Clackamas County and City of Portland boundary along Clatsop St. (roughly) on the south, and roughly SE 112th Ave. on the east. The new boundaries are primarily SE Division St. on the north, SE Clatsop St. (roughly) on the south, SE 62th Ave. (roughly) on the west, and Powell Butte along the eastern boundary. There is a new look up tool where you can plug in your address to see if it is within PSR’s program area. You can access that tool here: https://www.portland.gov/streetresponse/address-lookup-tool

With this expansion, the team will also be taking fire calls in additional FMAs that connect through the police districts. The team will be dispatched for certain non-life threatening, non-emergency fire medical calls in FMAs 25, 19, 7, 29.

As part of an evaluation on call types from the first month, on April 1 the PSR team started responding to calls for a person either outside or inside of a publicly accessible space such as a business, store, public lobby, etc. Prior to April 1, the team only responded to calls for a person outside. The team still does not currently respond within private residences. Additionally, the team will now co-respond with PF&R on certain public burning calls (such as outside warming and cooking fires) to offer wrap-around service assistance.

PSR has also created a dashboard so the public can access our call data. The data dashboard can be accessed here: https://www.portland.gov/streetresponse/data-dashboard

“After our first month in service we were able to see areas where we can increase our call load. We appreciate our partners at BOEC, PPB, and PF&R for offering helpful insight as we build this program,” says Program Manager Robyn Burek.

“I am so pleased to see that the Portland Street Response pilot is doing exactly what it set out to accomplish: experimenting with different ways to provide service by being nimble and responding to new information,” says Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty. “The City of Portland invested in a pilot so we can create the best system possible and we are using that investment wisely.”

Interested Persons Needed for Lower Southeast Rising Area Plan Project Advisory Committee

The City of Portland, Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability and Portland Bureau of Transporation, is seeking interested persons to serve in one of 20 positions on the Lower Southeast Rising Area Plan Project Advisory Committee. The Lower SE Rising Area Plan will assess land use and transportation issues in portions of Brentwood-Darlington, Mt Scott-Arleta, Woodstock and Lents. The purpose of the project is to expand neighborhood commercial opportunities and address the historic lack of transportation options. We invite you to apply and share this opportunity. Applications are currently due by March 5, but all interested parties are highly encouraged to apply throughout March. Click here to learn more about the committee and how to apply.

Even if you are not able to join the committee, we still want to stay connected! Learn more about the project and subscribe for occasional email updates by visiting the project website: https://www.portland.gov/bps/lower-se-rising

Neighbors For Clean Air Mapping Tool

Image of Potential Diesel Impact Locator Mapping Tool with Mt. Scott-Arleta featured

Neighbors for Clean Air launched a mapping tool to track nearby construction in real time and help neighborhoods better understand the relationship between potential diesel emission sources and local development. The mapping tool calculates the square feet of construction area and the number of floors based on building permits.

Clackamas and Multnomah Counties rank in the top 5 percent of counties nationwide for ambient diesel particulate concentrations. While on-road/highway vehicles, rail, industrial, commercial, and other sources are significant contributors, it is estimated that as much of as 65% of Portland Metro emissions sources come from non-road vehicles (construction, agricultural, marine, etc.).

Unlike Washington and California states, non-road vehicles do not have to meet diesel exhaust standards in Oregon and many older diesel engines operate within our state. Fine particulates from diesel emissions represent a community health risk with a disproportionate impact to historically underserved people. Neighbors for Clean Air will connect you to actions to help improve air quality and keep our community healthy.

Join the Neighbors for Clean Air for a free online seminar on December 10th to learn about expanding air quality monitors and learn more about the issue.